Overcoming Writer’s Block

I don’t believe in writer’s block. Yes, I believe that writers can get stuck, frustrated with, disillusioned by, and tired of their writing projects. I believe this because I’ve experienced all of these things.

However, “writer’s block” to me sounds permanent and insurmountable. And it is most certainly neither of these. So whether you’re experiencing writer’s block, writer’s pause, frustration with your characters, or uninspired by your plot, there is a way out. Here are three tips that I use when I get stuck.

Go for a Walk

Or a run, or a swim, or vacuum your house, or work in the garden. In other words, do something besides sitting there staring at the blank page. Physical movement helps—it gets blood flowing, and distracts you. And if you haven’t cleaned in a while, well, then you’re killing two birds with one stone. Double your productivity! But seriously, I do some of my best thinking while I’m doing physical tasks that require very little conscious thought, such as vacuuming or talking a long walk. Continue reading

When the Movie is Better than the Book, Part 2

As a writer of books, I often feel guilty when I like a film adaptation better than the book that inspired it. I feel sort of like a traitor to my craft, as it were. But ultimately, I like a good story—and sometimes, the movie tells a better story than the book. In this post, I explained in detail why I think that the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz told a better story than Baum’s original classic book.

Here is a list of some other movies that I think are better than their original book inspirations. In most of these cases, I feel that the movie version told a more cohesive story—whether it be fewer extraneous sub-plots, better pacing, fewer minor characters, or just plain easier to follow. In some cases, the movie ending was more positive or satisfying than the book ending, which is something I’m partial to. Continue reading

Decopunk Aesthetic: #ThursdayAesthetic Images

With the recent social media trend of sharing aesthetic posts or mood boards for books, I thought I’d join in.

Below are some images that I feel help to set the stage for my current 1920s historical fantasy series. Glamour, intrigue, and danger are a part of Cornelia Jones’ life. Magic and advanced technology flourish in her Roaring 20s world!

 

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Choosing a Historical Time Period for Your Dieselpunk Story

One of the aspects of dieselpunk is the time period and associated aesthetics. The “punk” aspects of fantasy, the paranormal, high-tech gadgets, or alternate history blend with the “diesel” age—from about World War I to post-World War II/1950s era.

I chose the Roaring 20s for the setting of my dieselpunk series starring the enigmatic high-class adventurer Mrs. Jones. Why the Roaring 20s? Well, for the story I wanted to tell and the world I wanted to build, it seemed like the most ideal time period.

Post-war Decadence

My main character Cornelia Jones is a wealthy, upper class woman who very much enjoys the privileges of her class. Fine clothes, dinner parties, and a house full of servants is what she expects out of life. She’s not arrogant or snobbish, but she is accustomed to luxury. The 1920s saw a booming economy and a world of people ready to put the grimness of the Great War behind them. For a character who loves the glamorous life, the Roaring 20s was an obvious choice for a setting. Continue reading

Historytellers Scavenger Hunt!

Welcome to the Historytellers Scavenger Hunt! This is a blog hunt dedicated to historical fiction set in the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s where all genres are welcome. You’ll get the opportunity to discover new authors, new stories, and to meet and talk to other readers who love this time period. You’ll also have the opportunity to win the grand prize which includes a digital copy of all the novels participating in the hunt.

The hunt will be online on March 17, 2019 from midnight to midnight (that’s 00:00 to 23:59) EDT.

Go to the Historytellers Scavenger Hunt page to find out all about the hunt.

 

***THE SCAVENGER HUNT***

Directions: I’ve included my lucky number on this post. (You will spot it! Just keep on reading!) All my fellow authors participating in the hunt will include a lucky number on their posts. Collect the these numbers and add them up.

Entry Form: When you have that lucky total number, make sure you fill out the form here to officially qualify for the grand prize. Only entries that have the correct number will qualify.

Rules: Anyone can take part. To be eligible for the grand prize, you must submit the completed entry form by Sunday 17 March 23:59 EDT. Entries sent without the correct number or without contact information will not be considered.

LET THE HUNT BEGIN!

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Coming this Sunday! Historytellers Scavenger Hunt!

This is just a quick post to give you a heads up about the HISTORYTELLERS Scavenger Hunt coming this Sunday. You are all invited!

13 authors of historical fiction set in the 1910s, 1920s and 1930s are joining together to offer a bundle of their books to one lucky reader, and that reader could be you, don’t you think?

Head over HERE to see how you can play the hunt. It’s easy, I promise! And please share! The more people we have, the more fun we’ll have!

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